The The Next Three Days

The The Next Three Days

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The The Next Three Days

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In Pittsburgh, the family man and community college teacher John Brennan has his life turned upside down when his beloved wife Lara Brennan is arrested, accused for murdering her boss, and sent to the Allegheny County Jail. Along three years, John raises their son Luke alone and appeals to the court; however, the evidences against Lara are solid - the motive, since she had and argument with her boss; her fingerprints in the murder weapon, a fire extinguisher; blood stain in her coat; and a witness that saw her leaving the parking lot - and her lawyer exhausts all the possible resources in justice. John believes in the innocence of his wife and interviews a former escapee from prison to learn how to plan a prison break. Then he plots a scheme to release Lara and travel abroad with Luke and her. However, he needs documents for the family; an escape plan; and lots of money. When John is informed that Lara will be transferred to the state prison within the next three days, he needs to raise a large amount and anticipate his strategy before the transference.
A married couple's life is turned upside down when the wife is accused of a murder.
When something unfair or wrong happens to us or someone we know, people attempt to rectify a situation in their own specific ways. Some would rather play by the rules, others have it in them to bend the rules, and there are those few that would actually break the rules if it meant protecting what matters most. That&#39;s what separates and defines our motivational factors as human beings living in an uncertain world where not everything is securely in our grasp.<br/><br/>The Brennan family gets a rude awakening when the wife gets arrested and the book slammed shut for cold blooded murder. Did she do it? Well, the community college teacher of a husband stands by to protect her despite the evidence being stacked. He&#39;s not a lawyer and he doesn&#39;t have friends in high places, but this everyday man does have enough determination to create a scheme to see his wife out one way or another. Enough to break a rule or even ten getting there.<br/><br/>&quot;The Next Three Days&quot; steadily paces as a drama/thriller. Russell Crowe&#39;s character goes through a number of emotional stages and encounters various people along the way, including those who are willing to help him, stop him or just plain got caught in the middle. There are some motivations glossed over as to how he got from point A to B, partly to give a continuous stream of action towards the latter portion to keep a viewer in the moment and from guessing the outcome. Those attempting to hamper his plan are unrealistically suspicious and coincidentally one step on top or behind to amp up the energy. It creates an escalating climax, but still feels manipulated to go a certain way by falling too much into the hands of the filmmakers to make this more marketable.<br/><br/>At the heart of it, the story manages to give something empowering back to those who&#39;ve ever had an injustice against them, from getting robbed, laid off, cheated or, here, a loved one getting taken away and no chance of getting them back unless, that is, something&#39;s done about it. (Also submitted on Cinema Freaks, http://docuniverse.blogspot.com)
The premise is great, the build up and setup are good too, you really find yourself drawn into the story and cheering for them to get away. But unfortunately as it nears the climax it gets increasingly stupid and poorly written. Their pursuers continue to hit 1-in-100,000 shots picking up their trail to keep the suspense up and eventually it just feels really lame and forced. Had they simply not been so lazy with their writing it would have been a really good movie. To me it reeks of a good screenplay that got hacked by a bunch of Hollywood execs looking to up the action level by 15% when in reality it would have been much better if they just left it alone.
The plot is worked out with care, and it takes its time, unapologetically, in a manner that's perfectly suited to thinking adults. The whole enterprise reeks of class.
When his wife Lara (<a href="/name/nm0006969/">Elizabeth Banks</a>) is convicted of murdering her boss and sentenced to life in prison, community college teacher John Brennan (<a href="/name/nm0000128/">Russell Crowe</a>) exhausts all possible avenues of appeal. The only solution left is to break her out of prison. He consults Damon Pennington (<a href="/name/nm0000553/">Liam Neeson</a>), a former prison escapee turned author, who warns him that he&#39;ll need fake IDs and passports, an escape plan, a destination that doesn&#39;t extradite, and lots of money. But that&#39;s just the easy part. The hard part is not getting caught. The Next Three Days is a remake of the 2008 French film <a href="/title/tt1217637/">Pour elle (2008)</a>, which was written by Guillaime Lemans and Fred Cavayé (who also directed the movie). The screenplay for the remake was adapted by Canadian film-maker Paul Haggis, who also produced and directed The Next Three Days. In the film, John develops his criminal skills by searching the internet for information. One thing he finds is a YouTube video that shows how to make a bump key for breaking into key-locked areas. Yes, there really is such a thing as a bump key. The most likely explanation is that Lara knew all of her appeals had been denied, and she was resigned to the fact that she was going to spend the rest of her life in prison. She wanted John to move on with his life, and by admitting to the murder, she hoped he would stop defending her innocence. a5c7b9f00b