Star Trek Movie Hindi Free Download

Star Trek Movie Hindi Free Download

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Star Trek Movie Hindi Free Download

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It is the 23rd century and together with the crew of the Federation starship Enterprise we travel across the galaxy to meet new and exciting life forms on distant planets. The 80 episode TV series which was produced from 1966 to 1969 has now cult character and has fans all over the world.
A 1960's sci-fi action adventure series set in the 23rd century based around the crew of the USS Enterprise, representing the United Federation of Planets (including earth) on a five-year mission in outer space to explore new worlds, seek new life and new civilizations, and to boldly go where no one has gone before. The Enterprise is commanded by handsome and brash Captain James Tiberius "Jim" Kirk. Kirk's two best friends are Commander Spock (last name unpronounceable to humans) the ship's half-human/half-Vulcan Science Officer and First/Executive Officer (i.e. second-in-command) from the planet Vulcan, and Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Leonard H. "Bones" McCoy. They along with a crew of approximately 430, including helmsman Lieutenant Hikaru Kato Sulu, navigator Ensign Pavel Andreievich Chekov, Officer Lieutenant Nyota Uhura, and chief engineer Lieutenant Commander Christopher Jorgensen "Scotty" Scott -- confront strange alien races, friendly and hostile alike, as they explore unknown worlds. the Enterprise battles aliens, megalomaniac computers, time paradoxes, psychotic murderers, and even Khan. The series is known for looking at then (1960's) hot topics such as Sex, War, God, Religion, Politics and Racism and other things that make up the human condition through a lens of the future. The 80 episode TV series which was produced from 1966 to 1969 has now cult characters and has fans all over the world.
This show was very influential in its time and created a successful franchise, but TV has changed a lot and, watching it now, the show seems aged. Even though it was advanced for its time, if you judge it with modern sensitivity you&#39;ll notice the implicit sexism. Still, that&#39;s not really on the show, but on society as a whole. Worse than that, too many chapters are just not very good. The budget was very small, but that did not prevent them from creating some memorable chapters. Most of the time, though, you have too similar stories: a more or less human-looking space jerk wearing a ludicrous costume causes some trouble, a scantily-clad woman throws herself in Captain&#39;s Kirk&#39;s arms, McCoy and Spock do some verbal sparring and everything is solved in time for the credits. <br/><br/>The actors, starting with William Shatner, do a lot of over-acting, although I don&#39;t really mind that, it feels like watching dramatic theater. What I mind is the mediocre scripts in many chapters.<br/><br/>The characters are likable, and Spock is simply great, although you have to wonder at how the small group of main officers do everything around the ship and happily leave the ship and put themselves in danger at any possible occasion.<br/><br/>Worth watching for some very good chapters and for historical reasons, to see the show that started the franchise and captured the imagination of countless teenagers, but compared with more modern shows in the franchise, like TNG and Deep Space 9, the age shows. It&#39;s just not as good. TV was just not as good then. Unless you are a big fan and want to watch the whole thing, I&#39;d recommend watching only the best chapters.
I recently had opportunity to watch some of the &quot;Enhanced&quot; Blu-Ray versions of some of the Season 1 and 2 episodes. I was appalled, after CBS doing such a good job with the 2009 Reboot, how badly the CGI graphics were in the &quot;Enhanced&quot; versions: GARBAGE.<br/><br/>To &quot;re-imagine&quot; the exterior graphics of The Original Series: I am not against the idea of it, but to do it BADLY, is an insult to the people in 1966 who made the original shots look great with paper-clips, tape and glue, and plenty of imagination. The Digital Enterprise has NO definition, the &quot;outer space&quot; scenes look like some child goofed around with a Mandelbrot generator.<br/><br/>Back in 1966, I watched this from the very first episode aired: &quot;The Man Trap&quot; to the very last episode aired: &quot;Turnabout Intruder&quot;-I was nine years old at the time, and I was introduced to a whole universe of possibilities.<br/><br/>Even in the short two and a half year run, this show has affected us and our children and our children&#39;s children. It has generated eleven movies and four full blown television shows, it is a Future History story, which we who started watching in 1966, are living in NOW.<br/><br/>This is why I was appalled by the destruction of the integrity of The Original Series by the snipping out of the amazingly well done original Graphics and the replacement thereof with graphics with absolutely no imagination or depth.<br/><br/>I understand, that owners of the Blu Ray sets can choose between ORIGINAL or &quot;enhanced&quot; graphics. At least they gave us THAT choice. But If I could choose further, I&#39;d choose not to have the crappy &quot;Digital&quot; versions at all!

&quot;TOS&quot; is an abbreviation for &quot;The Original Series&quot;. It is used by fans to diffferentiate between this series and any of the spin-off series. The other series are The Animated Series (TAS), The Next Generation (TNG), Deep Space Nine (DS9), Voyager (VOY), Enterprise (ENT) and Discovery (DSC). The original shooting model of the U.S.S. Enterprise measures 11 feet long, 5 feet wide, and 32 inches tall (3.4 x 1.5 x 0.8 metres), weighing in at about 200 pounds (90 kg). It is currently on display at the gift shop of the Smithsonian Institution, in Washington, D.C. The model of the U.S.S. Enterprise was designed by <a href="/name/nm0420142/">Walter M. &quot;Matt&quot; Jeffries</a>. Nearly all Federation ships featured throughout &quot;Star Trek&quot; are based on this model. The crawl spaces on ships were named &quot;Jeffries Tubes&quot; in his honor. Desilu was a production company owned by <a href="/name/nm0000789/">Desi Arnaz</a> and <a href="/name/nm0000840/">Lucille Ball</a>. By the time &quot;Star Trek&quot; and &quot;<a href="/title/tt0060009/">Mission: Impossible (1966)</a>&quot; went into production in 1966, Ms. Ball was the sole owner of the studio. A year later, Paramount bought out Desilu, but Desilu was allowed to continue using their name as long as their shows were in production.<br/><br/>Not every episode ends with Desilu. From &quot;The Immunity Syndrome&quot; through the end of the series, episodes end with the Paramount logo. A black and white print of &quot;The Cage&quot; was screened by <a href="/name/nm0734472/">Gene Roddenberry</a> in September, 1966 on the &quot;World Science Fiction Convention&quot; along with &quot;Where No Man Has Gone Before.&quot;<br/><br/>In the 1980s a half black-and-white half color print was made available on VHS tape edited together from &quot;The Menagerie&quot; and a black and white print of &quot;The Cage&quot;.<br/><br/>An original, full-color negative was found in the Paramount archives in 1988 (some fans speculate that they simply colorized the black-and-white print, but it seems unlikely). This print - and the full pilot itself - first aired in the United States as part of a special during the strike-shortened second season of &quot;<a href="/title/tt0092455/">Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987)</a>,&quot; in October 1988. The first scheduled airing of the episode in the U.S. was on the Sci-Fi Channel in 1998.<br/><br/>The reason why some fans think that the color version was colorized is that they don&#39;t realize that the camera negative was silent. So what they did was to print the negative, and synch it with the soundtrack to the half black and white version (hence the quality of the sound changing like it had in the previous release). Season 1: Thursdays, 8:30 - 9:30pm. Season 2: Fridays, 8:30 - 9:30pm. Season 3: Fridays, 10:00 - 11:00pm. All times are Eastern/Pacific. (NBC aired 12 or 13 third season episodes during the summer of 1969 on Tuesdays at 7:30 - 8:30, replacing &quot;<a href="/title/tt0061267/">The Jerry Lewis Show</a>,&quot; a variety show. Most of them were third season repeats, but &quot;<a href="/title/tt0708485/">Turnabout Intruder</a>&quot; had its first run in that time slot, on June 3, 1969.) No. &quot;Star Trek&quot; had no predetermined ending point. (Captain Kirk makes reference to a &quot;five-year mission&quot; in the introduction, but the show was not intended to stop after five seasons either.)<br/><br/>&quot;Star Trek&quot; was nearly canceled during both the first and second seasons. A very creative and aggressive letter-writing campaign to NBC was enough to save the series for a third season.<br/><br/>But the show was now scheduled in the Friday night 10-11 &quot;suicide&quot; slot. The slot was particularly bad for &quot;Star Trek,&quot; whose typical fan would be going out on Friday night. (VCRs, of course, were not around in the late 60s.) After the third season, &quot;Star Trek&quot; was finally canceled.<br/><br/>Roddenberry promised that he would return to Producer status which he held in the first two pilots and the first nine regular episodes, if NBC puts the show to a decent, 7:30PM timeslot. However when NBC put Trek into the &quot;suicide&quot; slot of 10PM Fridays, he stepped off and had very little control over the series during the third season. According to <a href="/name/nm0000638/">William Shatner</a>&#39;s book &quot;Star Trek Memories,&quot; the campaign originated when <a href="/name/nm0872856/">Bjo</a> and John Trimble approached Gene Roddenberry, and they asked him for ideas on how to reach other fans of the show (The Internet did not exist in those days, so it had to be letters, phone calls, and face-to-face contact). As a token for their efforts, Bjo Trimble had a walk-on role in <a href="/title/tt0079945/">Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979)</a> (1979). Fans of the show to this day regard the couple as the ones who saved &quot;Star Trek.&quot; Though science-fiction conventions had been around long before &quot;Star Trek&quot; entered the scene (Gene Roddenberry premiered two episodes at a sci-fi convention), the first convention devoted to &quot;Star Trek&quot; took place in New York City, in 1972. Both were made up on the set by <a href="/name/nm0000559/">Leonard Nimoy</a>. In the script of &quot;<a href="/title/tt0708463/">The Enemy Within</a>&quot; Spock disabled the duplicate Kirk by pistol whipping him. Nimoy felt that it would be too &quot;savage&quot; and unsuitable for such a logical individual as Spock. He asked the director if he could improvise his own idea. He said yes, and Nimoy choreographed the now-famous neck pinch with Shatner for the episode. a5c7b9f00b