Juice Wrld Life

Juice Wrld Life


Juice WRLD Merch is contemplating another life. “You think I might be a FedEx worker, Mom?” he asks across space, a set during a swanky Soho hotel crammed with family and friends. Two nights previously, he was commanding moshpits at London’s O2 Arena, as tour support to Nicki Minaj. By the top of the week, his second album, Death Race for Love, is going to be at No 1 within the US charts. This weekend, he plays alongside Cardi B, Travis Scott, and Future at London’s Wireless festival; he collaborated with the latter on the album Juice WRLD Shirt on Drugs, which reached No 2 within the US last year. Still, the person born Jarad Higgins cannot help wondering where he would be had his esoteric blend of 00s emo and prescription-medicated hip-hop not blown up. “Music was so nearly just a hobby on behalf of me, so I’m always brooding about that,” he says. “What I’d do instead, who I’d be if it weren’t for all of this.”


Don’t expect to seek out him delivering parcels any time soon. Since Higgins started recording songs on his phone in 2015 while still at high school, the 20-year-old has evolved from SoundCloud rap also-ran to chart-busting mainstream name. Exploring anxiety and unrequited romance over booming trap beats and minor-chord guitars, he has won a fanbase raised in an online era during which genre tribalism has been dissolved. Tracks like his Sting-sampling 2018 breakout hit Lucid Dreams have earned him billions of streams and therefore the approval of Alicia Keys, who covered it at this year’s Grammys. Not that Higgins saw that. “I was taking a piss and missed it,” he laments today.