Hannibal Brooks Full Movie In Hindi Free Download

Hannibal Brooks Full Movie In Hindi Free Download

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Hannibal Brooks Full Movie In Hindi Free Download

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A prisoner of war working at a zoo gets the chance to escape from the Germans, so he does and he takes with him the elephant that he's been caring for. Together they head for the Swiss border and freedom.
In WW2, captured British soldier Stephen Brooks is on a prison train to Germany.On the train he meets an American prisoner, Packy, who's obsessed with escaping.Brooks tries to temper Packy and reminds him that escaped prisoners are shot if recaptured.Packy is insistent despite Brooks' warnings. On arrival at the POW camp Stalag 7A, Brooks and other fellow POWs are sent to work at the local Munich zoo, to care for the animals.Brooks is assigned to care for Lucy the elephant.The German caretaker in charge of Lucy is asked to train Brooks in his new job.At first, Brooks hates the assignment, considering the large amount of animal waste to be cleaned daily.However, he eventually becomes attached to Lucy the elephant.After a devastating bombing raid that kills some of the animals and zoo staff it is decided to evacuate the surviving animals.Lucy is scheduled to be transported by train to Innsbruck, Austria.On the departure day, the train is commandeered by a moody SS Colonel, for his troops.The colonel jokes that Brooks can walk the elephant all the way to Austria, if he wishes.The joke gives Brooks the idea of walking the elephant to Austria, with two armed guards and a Polish maid as cook.The Munich Zoo director, worried for Lucy's safety, agrees to evacuate her and send her to Austria on foot.Two soldiers provide the armed guard.One is Willy,a friendly Austrian soldier, and the other is Kurt,a brutal German soldier who gets drunk often, insults everyone and threatens to shoot the elephant.The group leaves Munich on a sunny day but the voyage to Austria isn't a promenade in the park when they start running into trouble.
A breezy, light-hearted and, dare I say, humorous World War II movie very much reflecting the sensibilities of the late 60&#39;s. Oliver Reed is Lance Corporal Brooks, the perfect antihero with very little respect for authority, even when the authority is SS Colonel von Haller played with a certain roguish charm by Wolfgang Preiss. As a captured British soldier, Brooks willingly volunteers to work in the Munich Zoo where he becomes the caretaker for an elephant named Lucy. The zoo is bombed and he is charged with taking Lucy to safety. Thwarted by von Haller in his attempt to get her there by rail, Brooks and his escort (two guards and a female cook) undertake the journey on foot. Circumstances arise that lead to the decision to attempt an escape over the Alps to Switzerland, and because Brooks has grown so attached to her, leaving Lucy behind is not an option. As you can imagine, trying to escape Nazi Germany with an elephant in tow makes for some interesting situations.<br/><br/>This is not high art, but the story is good, and there&#39;s a nice little twist, too. The cast is universally good and you can tell the actors are having a good time. Joining Reed and Preiss is an elfin Michael J. Pollard as a fellow POW turned goofy guerilla. Peter Carsten and Helmut Lohner are Brooks&#39; German guards and Karin Baal is the cook who, with a very 60&#39;s sensibility, explains to Brooks why she made what might not have been such an obvious choice in the 1940&#39;s.<br/><br/>All in all Hannibal Brooks is a highly entertaining film. If only this movie were on DVD, or even video for that matter.
Before British director Michael Winner made his world-famous or infamous Charles Bronson revenge thriller &quot;Death Wish,&quot; he made a most unusual World War II movie. Imagine a British P.O.W., played by Oliver Reed, escaping to Switzerland with an Indian elephant that he has been ordered to evacuate from a German zoo and you&#39;ve got the basic plot of &quot;Hannibal Brooks.&quot; In his autobiography &quot;Winner Take All,&quot; Winner remembers that Aida, the elephant, had to be accompanied by another elephant, each of them tipping the scales at two and half tons! Between the elephant, the rowdy Reed, and drug-addled Michael J. Pollard, Winner wound up helming the usual firefights between the Germans and the escaped prisoners-of-war that make up this slightly overlong war movie. Winner stages a convoy ambush, a train derailment, avalanches of logs and stones, and ultimately the destruction of a massive border guard post with verve. Although it doesn&#39;t qualify as a really big World War II epic like director J. Lee Thompson&#39;s &quot;The Guns of Navarone&quot; or Brian G. Hutton&#39;s &quot;Where Eagles Dare,&quot; &quot;Hannibal Brooks&quot; is still above-average because it is so unlike all other World War II movies. <br/><br/>Patriotism doesn&#39;t clap its heels together and storm to the front of the action. Indeed, James Donald of &quot;The Great Escape&quot; where he portrayed the Allied P.O.W. Commandant has the only role in &quot;Hannibal Brooks&quot; that vocalizes patriotism. Meanwhile, the Germans—especially the S.S.—aren&#39;t demonized. Appropriately enough, Winner relied on Pollard—fresh from his Oscar nominated role in &quot;Bonnie &amp; Clyde&quot;—to serve as comic relief, and Pollard easily steals the show from Reed and his gigantic co-star. French composer Francis Lai furnishes a majestic orchestral score that sounds like something the 101 Strings would have no problem immortalizing. Nevertheless, like the pachyderm, &quot;Hannibal Brooks&quot; amounts to a slow-moving melodrama which makes it easy to pause it and walk off for a while to attend to other necessities. There is no burning urgency, but the film dutifully arrives at its grand finale.<br/><br/>The Germans captured Stephen &#39;Hannibal&#39; Brooks (Oliver Reed of &quot;The Three Musketeers&quot;) in the beginning after he has repaired a vehicle and they shoot it the tires out, taking him prisoner. Cue the Francis Lai music and lenser Robert Paynter, who worked with Winner on most of his pictures, regales us with scenic long shots of Germany as a period train trundles through it. During the train ride, British enlisted man Brooks meets American enlisted man Packy (Michael J. Pollard of &quot;Bonnie &amp; Clyde&quot;) and persuades him to serve as their look-out while they try to loosen some planks in the ceiling of a train. The escape attempt is short-lived, but for the remainder of this 101-minute actioneer, Packy and Brooks cross paths at the best and worst times. Once they have been settled into Stalag 7-A, our heroes learn that the Germans are looking for men to work for them in the nearby town of Munich. The vicar (James Donald of &quot;The Great Escape&quot;) suggests they pass up this opportunity because they are still on the British Army payroll, but Brooks takes the Germans up on their offer and finds himself tending an elephant named Lucy (Aida in her only starring role) when he isn&#39;t in camp.<br/><br/>Packy manages to escape when the Allies drop bombs on the zoo. Brooks refuses to abandon Lucy. A piece of shapnel lodges in her side, but our hero nurses her back to health. The bombing killed the German elephant so Lucy is entrusted entirely to Brooks. Indeed, the zoo curator arranges for Brooks—under guard of course—to take Lucy to Innsbruck and so the journey of hardship begins for both man and beast. Kurt, the German soldier (Peter Carsten of &quot;Dark of the Sun&quot;) who supervises their trip, rubs Brooks raw and neither man has respect for the other. Eventually, Brooks can longer abide Kurt, and they tangle in the middle of the woods when Kurt makes a foolish move to shoot Lucy. The second time that they trade blows, Kurt falls down a hillside and the woman, Vronia (Karin Baal of &quot;Dead Eyes of London&quot;), who accompanies them discovers that he is dead. Brooks decides to make a dash for Switzerland. Vronia and a sympathetic German guard, Willy (Teutonic actor Helmut Lohner), go their different ways. The closest character to being a villain—other than the drunken Kurt—is German Colonel von Haller. One of the most recognized German character actors to play officers in World War II movies for 30 years—Wolfgang Priess—is instantly credible and twice as villainous. Initially, he forces Lucy, Brooks, and Kurt vacate a train freight car that was assigned to accommodate them during their trip to a quiet part of Germany that Allied bombers wouldn&#39;t devastate. Later, when they are crossing a narrow bridge, our heroes encounter the unsavory von Haller again. This time Brooks doesn&#39;t capitulate to von Haller. He explains to the colonel while Kurt stands by impotently that you cannot turn an elephant around on a narrow bridge and that Lucy cannot walk backwards.<br/><br/>&quot;Hannibal Brooks&quot; won&#39;t top anybody&#39;s list of memorable World War II movies. This is war as an adventure with few opportunities to cast combat in an unglamorous look. Nevertheless, Winner does make war seem ironic. After they knock over an eight truck German convoy, Packy discovers the Jerries were carrying cans of bully beef. This color picture is still entertaining and most of all different compared to most combat movies. Winner recounts in his autobiography that he collaborated on the script treatment of &quot;Hannibal Brooks&quot; with a Norwich house painter who tended an elephant in Munich during the war.

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