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ONLINE Thrones, Dominations by Dorothy L. Sayers apple francais wiki writer online

ONLINE Thrones, Dominations by Dorothy L. Sayers apple francais wiki writer online

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Book description
This is going to be long. I read Thrones, Dominations not too long after it first came out; this is a second reading, and first review. Of Thrones, Dominations, Dorothy L. Sayers had written six rough chapters, and devised a plot diagram in coloured inks. When sixty years later a brown paper parcel containing a copy of the manuscript turned up in her agents safe in London, her literary trustees commissioned Jill Paton Walsh to complete it.I dont know. No, thats not true – I do. This is not what fans of Lord Peter wanted or needed. Its not terrible, but I have seen it referred to – often – as fan-fic. Im not sure the label exactly fits Thrones, Dominations, but it is like a great many Star Trek novels I read when I was a teenager. In so many of those, it seemed very much as if the writer had a generic science fiction manuscript sitting unsold in his drawer, realized Star Trek novels were big at that time, and changed the names and a handful of other details and got it published as part of the franchise despite barely a hint of knowledge of or similarity to Star Trek as aired on television. I have little background knowledge of Jill Paton Walsh; Im not saying that she doesnt know and love the Lord Peter books as much as any of us. But Im tempted to. Because there are times when Thrones, Dominations feels like it ought to. The characters strike the right chord for a paragraph, a line of narrative just feels good … and then it goes back to the feeling of the alignment being somewhat off. Its distracting to be wondering throughout the book was that genuine Sayers or counterfeit? – hoping in some ways that some of the good lines were JPW, because that would mean she was capable, while knowing given the sheer weight of not-Sayers that it was unlikely. The metaphor that came to me about halfway through (because I do love me a metaphor) was: its like meeting with an old friend you havent seen in a long time, and theyve changed. Now and then as you talk theres a glimpse of the person you used to be so close to, a spark of what used to be, a connection like the old warmth - and then a minute later youre sitting with a stranger again. A mostly likeable enough stranger, in a way, but ... A complaint Ive read about the book, with which I wholeheartedly agree, is that JPW seems to have gone back through the existing novels and gathered up minor characters – from Bill Rumm to Uncle Paul (and someone on the LPW group is right – he would not have called him Uncle Pandarus in front of everyone) to Harriets friends Sylvia and Eiluned to Gerry and Freddy Arbuthnot, along with references to canon books (far more than I remember Sayers ever using), and tossed it all like fairy dust into the readers eyes, hoping for a façade of credibility and/or distraction from the books deficiencies. I kept waiting for Miss Climpson. Oh, there she is, and Reggie Pomfret too for heavens sake. JPW tried so hard to cram everything into this book that she didnt spend enough time on anything – including the major characters.Where there is a plethora of cameo appearances, there is a disturbing dearth of Bunter. He has had a handful of lines of dialogue and one scene in which he sits down for a drink and a debriefing with Peter. Not enough. Not nearly enough. I hate it. For that matter, theres surprisingly little Parker, and what there is comes off as … priggish. Despite Harriet, he is primly made to state I dont read detective novels in an affronted tone. His working with Peter feels off; his marriage to Mary didnt change the way they worked together, why should Peters marriage? I dont like this Charles, what little we see of him. A line from Charles: Its like trying to overawe a brick wall. For the sake of my sanity I have to believe DLS would have come up with something sharper than that. The Dowager Duchess has always been one of my very favorite people in any book, and … I dont think this does her justice. She needs to witter away and still under it all be perfectly sensible. She doesnt witter nearly enough here; there isnt enough fluff. Harriet is much too deferential to Peter. When she is with him, she seems to walk on eggshells. When she is not with him, she references him or quotes him in nearly every other sentence. She sounds more like a June Cleaveresque 50s housewife than an independent woman who very much has her own opinions, thank you very much. And why is she supposed to have hired a secretary (Miss Bracy)? Shes written for years without one, quite efficiently. Was she expecting such massive output that she would not be able to keep up with her own typing? It seems in fact to have had a dampening effect … Yes, yes, the marriage, and shes safe now and doesnt need to write. The incapacitation brought by happiness, along with the surprising leaning toward tragedy for the new book, is nicely done – unfortunately both are beaten to death. Also beaten to a pulp is the idea that this is a New Thing for Peter and Harriet. Peter has to adjust to having the woman he has sought after so long, to living with her in a new expansive home and the changes that entails. Harriet has all that to cope with, with the added wrinkle that she is going from one income bracket to very much another, from a flat by herself to a stately home with not only Peter but a staff. From dressing as she pleased and going out when she liked with friends to patronizing a pseudo-French dressmaker and attending Wimsey family affairs. Its all new to her, every waking moment. I wonder if this is why JPW chose to stick so much to Harriets point of view? We the loyal readers are too familiar with Peter-and-Bunter, and never had much chance to become too familiar with married-Peter-and-Harriet, even less chance than theyve had themselves. She might have felt safer using eyes we havent seen through as much, in a setting which is alien to the character, thereby accounting for any unusual behavior. Most important of all, Peter ... I dont know. There are brief flashes, as I said. Otherwise, I miss him, even though hes puportedly right there. Ive been reading about writing dialogue lately, and that shed light on the problem here. I think that if you take any of the canon books (yes, I do subtract the JPW books from canon, whatever the Sayers estate might say) and strip the dialogue of all the tags (Peter said and said Harriet and replied Parker and so on), it would not be very hard to pick out the lines spoken by Peter (or Harriet or Parker or Bunter, for that matter). Here … Peters dialogue is very generic, and where its not it is very similar to lines spoken by Harriet and Parker. There are several Parker lines which I would have attributed to Peter. And Peter … Peter sounds like just anyone. That should not be.)The scissors moment of the book was depressingly clearly telegraphed. I saw it coming so far off. (Scissors moment is what its always called on the Yahoo Lord Peter Group: In the short story The Footsteps That Ran it is illustrated by looking at the letters ciorssss and finding no meaning until the letters just jump around in the brain and scissors becomes clear: the Aha! moment.) The quotes and allusions are even more aggressively obscure to … well, to me at least, than any Dorothy L. Sayers ever used. I like that Peter and Harriet are able to volley them comfortably back and forth – they always did. But I dont remember the tags ever putting my nose out of joint quite like this before. (Which could be because Ive read the books so many times – but I dont think so.) (Im still trying to figure out what exactly is meant by Peter dislikes women with green fingernails – perhaps a reference to Picasso?)This is a spoiler, of sorts, but not if youve read the canon stories: (view spoiler)[One huge complaint, loud and irritated: Oh, come on, really? Harriet is vomiting randomly and someone actually tells Youre looking well … Positively glowing? Oh – spare me. Isnt there some way of hinting a womans pregnant without using clichés that have been used ad nauseum in every cheesy novel and tv show since time began? Even if I didnt know about Bredon and young Peter and company that very first scene of Harriet sprinting off to be sick – and then feeling just fine shortly after – would have pinged the radar. Spare me. (hide spoiler)]
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